p. 98 p. 99 p. 100 p. 101 p. 121

Once upon a time, there was a little boy who lived on a little farm in little town in Missouri in an enchanted kingdom called the United States of America. Outside the farmhouse stood a tar barrel, for patching roofs and fixing drains. And one day, to the distinct surprise and distincter displeasure of the little boy's mother and father, the white walls of the farmhouse were found decorated with large and fanciful drawings of animal – n tar. Like many geniuses, Walt Disney demonstrated, at a very early age, a proclivity for showing off his talent. (Like all little boys who paint on walls with tar, Walt Disney was punished.) Then, into the story, there came a kind of fairy-godmother character - Walt Disney's Aunt Maggie, who brought him pads of drawing paper and boxes of pencils. Not long after that, Walt Disney presented himself at the castle of the good king a country doctor who lived down the road. Walt showed the doctor a drawing he had made (of the doctor's horse, this time executed in a more conventional medium). The doctor patted him on the head and paid him a quarter for the picture. Like most contemporary geniuses in America, Walt Disney found out at a very early age that there is little point in the possession of talent unless it will sell.

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Teaser for Article in McCall's 1963-11

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