p. 00 p. 12 p. 13 p. 14 p. 15 p. 16 p. 17

Walt Disney was an environmentalist long before the word became popuiar. That ideology was epitomized through his wildlife documentaries and animated features.

But can a large corporation maintain idealistic environmental standards and still show a profit? Walt Disney World near Orlando, Fla., does.

‘At Disney World, development of an esthetic environment is a way of life, and Disney has proved that its money in the bank because its a major factor in bringing people back. The esthetic quality of the park contributes to bringing guests back for their second, third, and fourth times, explained Tom Moses, head of the Reedy Creek Improvement District, a special tax district encompassing Walt Disney World.

Walt Disney World covers 27,500 acres, two-thirds of which lie in Orange County and the remainder in Osceola County. It attracts more than 14 million visitors annually. The services necessary to accommodate such a development would be a drain on the budgets of both counties; consequently, the Florida legislature created the Reedy Creek Improvement District to provide those services necessary for the construction and operation of Walt Disney World.

[…]