The producer discusses his work on Who Framed Roger Rabbit and the upcoming Haunted Mansion.

While it seems like fans have had to wait forever, Buena Vista Home Video has finally released a deluxe special edition of Who Framed Roger Rabbit on DVD. Loaded to the ears with bonus materials &#Array; including an audio commentary, featurettes, an extensive documentary, short subjects, and more &#Array; the 2-disc set is bound to please fans.

In conjunction with the DVD's release, we were able to speak with Don Hahn, who served as associate producer on Who Framed Roger Rabbit. He went on to produce The Lion King, Hunchback of Notre Dame, Emperor's New Groove, Atlantis, and the upcoming film adaptation of the classic Disney theme park ride The Haunted Mansion.

IGN FILMFORCE: As an associate producer on Who Framed Roger Rabbit, what exactly did your duties entail?

DON HAHN: I produced the animation on Roger Rabbit.

IGNFF: When you were first presented with the task &#Array; a rather daunting one &#Array; what was your initial assessment of it?

HAHN: Well, it was kind of in two main arenas. One was, how do you integrate animation with live action &#Array; which had been done before in movies like Song of the South and Mary Poppins &#Array; but Bob Zemeckis wanted to do it in a very contemporary way, where the camera was moving and light sources were very moody and film noir, so that was one of the biggest hurdles to get over. The second one was the script, and we kind of had to bring the toons from the past &#Array; we had to bring back Bugs and Daffy and Sylvester, and characters from all different studios. I think that was part of the challenge. Luckily, Steven Spielberg was able to help us connect to the other studios and bring his kind of producer's guild to bear to give us access to those characters, and secondly we had to turn our animators loose to animate those characters. A lot of those characters, like Betty Boop, hadn't been seen or animated for decades, so that was a challenge &#Array; but a real pleasure &#Array; about Roger Rabbit, because in a funny way it was a kind of crossroads of the old and the new in that movie.

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